What is it about new technology that makes us immediately think, ‘Sure, what do I need that for?’

If it’s not something we can see ourselves using practically in everyday life, we tend to dismiss new technology as unnecessary.

However, that usually changes once we see it in action or hear positive reviews from other people.

Dermot Bannon and comedian Mario Rosenstock were presented with an unknown piece of technology in this week’s episode of What the Tech?

So, while we might think we don’t need something, chances are, once we have it, we often grow to love it.

Although we’re not sure that’s the case for this particular piece of smart home tech Dermot Bannon and comedian Mario Rosenstock were presented with in this week’s episode of What the Tech?

What The Tech? is brought to life with Vodafone Gigabit Broadband where a host of Irish TV stars get their hands on a mysterious piece of smart home tech and work together to see what it does.

After admitting that he’s ‘not great’ with new technology, Mario is a little perturbed that Dermot also confesses that he’s always thinking of the next product even while he’s working with the current one and gets ‘bored’ easily!

‘Really not a good idea for a guy who works on houses,’ Mario deadpans.

As they try to guess the function of the mysterious (and tiny!) gadget, Mario has Dermot in stitches as he breaks out some of his most famous impressions and improvises how they might react!

(The Roy Keane one is genius….) 

When they discover what the product actually is – a mini colour sensor – Dermot is immediately impressed, calling it a ‘lifesaver’, while Mario is decidedly less smitten.

‘It’s Shazam for paint!’ he exclaims.

What follows is a hilarious debate on when or how such a gadget could be of benefit in everyday life. We’ll leave it up to you to decide who wins!

However, as entertaining as it is, the men’s chat also raises an interesting point; when it comes to technology, it seems that one person’s trash is another person’s treasure.

Just because a gadget doesn’t initially look like it’s going to have widespread appeal – such as an interior design tool – it doesn’t mean it won’t get made and have a niche market willing to spend money on it.

When the idea of a 3D printer was first discussed in 1981 by Hideo Kodama of Nagoya Municipal Industrial Research Institute, no one could have predicted that it would become a reality three years later when Charles Hull made 3D-printing history by inventing stereolithography.

This process allowed designers and innovators make 3D models using digital data which could then be used to create a tangible object.

And while the true potential of 3D printers has yet to be reached, they are now more accessible and affordable than ever!

When they discover what the product actually is – a mini colour sensor – Dermot is immediately impressed

Of course, most people would argue that they have no need for a 3D printer in their home but for those who are fascinated by what it can do, it’s an endless source of wonder and possibility.

And who’s to say we won’t all have them in our homes in the next decade?

After all, there was a time when writing an essay for school meant asking your parents to get the alphabetised encyclopedias from the bookshelf so you could properly flesh out the topic you were given to write about.

And finishing a college assignment meant pulling an overnighter in the library, poring over huge books as you attempted to find references for everything you were writing.

Imagine saying that today to someone born after 1990!

The old way of doing things is appealing until the moment you realise just how handy the new product could come in…

Technology has given us instant access to a seemingly infinite source of information and while some might say it did us no harm to have to work for our research, there’s no denying that it is a huge time-saver.

Not to mention an actual life-saver when it comes to fields like medicine and the law.

And as technological advancements continue to progress at lightning speed, it’s not crazy to think that we will soon have a gadget for every possible chore or task within a matter of years!

Whether you want to use them or not is another matter. The old way of doing things is appealing until the moment you realise just how handy the new product could come in…

So, while a colour sensor might not seem like an important gadget for you to have, if it saves you several hour-long round trips to the paint store or helps you finalise a colour scheme without days of indecision, it might be worth it after all!

Transform your home with Vodafone Gigabit Broadband, now available in over 500,000 homes, for €25 a month for the first six months. Click here for more information.

Stay tuned to see who Dermot is partnered with in the next episode of ‘What the Tech?’!

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