‘Super Blood Wolf Moon’ to appear in the sky next month – Daily Mail

Get ready for the ‘Super Blood Wolf Moon’: First full moon of the New Year will come with a lunar eclipse and appear amazingly close to Earth

  • On Jan 20-21, the full moon will be a supermoon, and there will be a lunar eclipse
  • The supermoon means it sits in the closest point to Earth in its monthly orbit
  • As January’s moon is called Wolf Moon, event is dubbed ‘Super Blood Wolf Moon’

By Cheyenne Macdonald For Dailymail.com

Published: 16:36 EST, 27 December 2018 | Updated: 16:36 EST, 27 December 2018

The first full moon of 2019 is sure to be a spectacular sight.

On the night of January 20-21, the full moon will coincide with a total lunar eclipse, which will cause Earth’s satellite to take on an eerie red glow in an effect that’s come to be known as the Blood Moon.

At the same time, the moon will sit at the closest point to Earth in its orbit, when it will appear massive in the night sky.

It will make for a striking combination of both a supermoon and the Blood Moon, and marks the last total lunar eclipse we’ll see until 2021.

Scroll down for video 

On the night of January 20-21, the full moon will coincide with a total lunar eclipse, which will cause Earth’s satellite to take on an eerie red glow in an effect that’s come to be known as the Blood Moon. It will also be a supermoon, and January’s moon is known as the Wolf moon

From start to finish, the umbral lunar eclipse will last just over three and-a-half hours, with totality accounting for roughly an hour of this time, according to EarthSky.

This is when the moon sits in the shadow of our planet, taking on a reddish hue as a result of light scattering through Earth’s atmosphere.

The next total lunar eclipse come around until May 26, 2021.

The night-time eclipse, or Blood Moon, will be visible in many parts of the world, including all of North America, and parts of Europe and Africa, according to TimeandDate.

Other regions, including the Middle East and the rest of Africa, will be able to catch a glimpse of a partial eclipse at moonset.

From start to finish, the umbral lunar eclipse will last just over three and-a-half hours, with totality accounting for roughly an hour of this time, according to EarthSky . This is when the moon sits in the shadow of our planet, taking on a reddish hue as a result of light scattering

It will not be visible in Australia and East Asia.

There will also be a penumbral eclipse, though it is a very faint effect

As January’s full moon is already known as the Wolf Moon, the upcoming alignment of phenomena has made next month’s event sound particularly ominous.

Already, people have taken to calling it the ‘Super Blood Wolf Moon,’ among other variations.

While partial eclipses will take place before and after totality – when the moon is completely in shadow – the total eclipse itself will last just over an hour.

This is all dependent on where the moon falls within Earth’s shadow, EarthSky notes.

The night-time eclipse, or Blood Moon, will be visible in many parts of the world, including all of North America, and parts of Europe and Africa. File photo

WHAT IS A LUNAR ECLIPSE?  

An eclipse occurs any time a planet or moon passes between another planet, moon or the sun.

Depending on their orbits, they can be total or partial.

A lunar eclipse is a specific event which happens when Earth lines up directly between the sun and the moon.

When this happens, Earth blocks the light from the sun to the moon. Earth’s shadow then falls on the moon.

During a lunar eclipse, we can see Earth’s shadow on the moon.

They can last for several hours, but it is rare for a period of total eclipse to last longer than 100 minutes.  

At least two lunar eclipses happen every year.

A lunar eclipse is a specific event which happens when Earth lines up directly between the sun and the moon

‘The moon will pass through the northern half of the Earth’s shadow, to present a total eclipse for a period of 62 minutes,’ explains Bruce MuClure in a post for EarthSky.

‘However, if the moon would only travel more deeply into the Earth’s shadow, it’d result in an even longer total lunar eclipse.’

There will also be a penumbral eclipse before and after the umbral eclipse, when the moon will sit within the faint outer shadow.

But, to the average viewer, it might not appear any different than normal.

Advertisement

Read More

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.